Nixie: A Wearable Camera Drone in Development

Nixie The Wearable Camera That Flys On Demand

nixie-wearable-drone

This just may take the cake in the selfie department. Nixie is a tiny drone that you wear on your wrist. When released, the drone flies around you shooting video, eventually returning back. Winner of Intel’s Make It Wearable contest, the Nixie wearable flying camera may just be a prototype at the moment, but with a powerful team and money behind them, you can expect to see it come to market soon.

Nixie is the first wearable and flyable camera that you carry on your wrist like a watch. A swiveling camera sits at the middle of four flexible bands, each with an extendable propeller. To launch the wearable drone, simply unfold the bands from beneath your wrist and Nixie is ready for takeoff.

Once aloft, the drone is designed to detect your presence and fly around you, pointing the camera at you in order to film your adventures. Nixie was built on Intel’s Edison wearables development system that gives it enough computing power to do things such as track you and avoid obstacles.

Check out the cool footage below that was captured on the Nixie prototype. Now let’s see how quickly these get banned in National Parks….

http://flynixie.com/

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Throwable Camera Prototype Guarantees Pitch Perfect Photography

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Throwable Camera Prototype Guarantees Pitch Perfect Photography

It turns out that making a throwable camera isn’t that tricky. But making a throwable camera that doesn’t capture random obscure images, or spinning video that induces motion sickness, is kind of hard. In fact it’s taken Steve Hollinger years to develop such a camera, but with the Squito—his latest prototype—it looks like he’s almost nailed it.

As demonstrated, the ball features a series of built-in cameras looking out in all directions that are able to take photos of people as it sails through the air using intelligent image recognition. It’s also able to capture sweeping panoramas, full 360 degree images by automatically stitching together multiple exposures, and even full stabilized video.

But besides serving as a novel way to take a selfie, Holinger’s designed the Squito with several practical applications in mind. Thermal imaging and night vision capabilities coupled with the ability to wirelessly broadcast images makes it a useful tool for rescue personnel trying to assess a dangerous situation. Multiple Squitos can even be thrown at the same time to capture a wider field of view.

And most importantly, one day it’s going to totally revolutionize the baseball instant replay. The only thing standing between the Squito dream and reality is enough funding to perfect and commercialize this prototype. [Serveball via Engadget]